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Mosquito control in Garfield County

   •  Mosquito trap data
   •  West Nile virus prevention
   •  Contacts and resources
   •  Mosquito control operations in Garfield County
   •  Selecting an insect repellent
   •  West Nile virus news


13 human cases of West Nile Virus reported this season in Colorado

DENVER -- Colorado has seen a sharp increase in the number of cases of West Nile virus diagnosed in 2016. People, animals and mosquito pools have tested positive from the following counties this season: Adams, Arapahoe, Bent, Boulder, Denver, Douglas, El Paso, Gunnison, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Morgan, Rio Blanco and Weld. So far this year, 13 cases of human West Nile virus have been reported including one death.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment expects more cases to be diagnosed as the summer progresses. Public health officials advise Colorado residents to continue to take precautions against West Nile virus by using mosquito repellent and other methods to avoid mosquito bites. Last year, 101 people in Colorado contracted West Nile virus, and three died.

"Although we can't predict how much more West Nile virus activity will occur this summer, we know the virus is present, and that means people are at risk," said Jennifer House, state public health veterinarian.

To help prevent West Nile virus infection, follow the four D's:
•    DRAIN standing water around your house weekly. Remember to drain water from tires, cans, flowerpots, clogged rain gutters, rain barrels, toys and puddles.
•    DUSK and DAWN are when mosquitoes are most active. Limit outdoor activities and take precautions to prevent mosquito bites during these times.
•    DEET is an effective ingredient to look for in insect repellents. Always follow label instructions carefully.
•    DRESS in long sleeves and pants in areas where mosquitoes are active. For more information about West Nile virus, visit https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/cdphe/west-nile-virus. You may use the attached graphics to spread the word about precautions.


Garfield County update for week of August 8, 2016
Locally, high counts of Culex tarsalis (West Nile carrying mosquitoes) were trapped last week (August 2) in the Willow Creek neighborhood of Battlement Mesa. The area was fogged last week.

Culex tarsalis was also trapped in smaller numbers in the towns of Carbondale, Glenwood Springs, New Castle, Parachute, Rifle, and Silt. Culex tarsalis was also detected in the unincorporated areas of Garfield County in the Mile Pond area, east of Rifle and at Coal Ridge High School between Silt and New Castle.

Please have your repellant of choice handy when outdoors, especially at dawn and dusk as Culex tarsalis is most active at those times. Wear long sleeves and pants when out at dawn and dusk.

Recent mosquito trap data


First horse to be diagnosed with West Nile virus in Colorado
August 5, 2016
Colorado Department of Agriculture press release


Prevention tips


How to read the charts:
   • The species of mosquito that carries the West Nile virus is Culex tarsalis.

   • Culex mosquitoes are indicated in red in the pie charts.

   • The pie charts reflect the number of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location.

   • The charts breaks down the trap count by individual species.

   • Culex numbers that approach 50 or more in a trap in a single night, in a single location are a concern.

   • This number may lead to a limited, truck-mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes.

   • When Culex counts approach 50, residents need to safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes. See information below on prevention and insect repellents.

Air Show
Colorado Mosquito Control Operations Manager Steve Sheaffer searches for mosquito larvae and then treats for it in locations around Garfield County.

Mosquito control operations in Garfield County
Garfield County recognizes the risk of mosquito-borne disease associated with flood irrigation practices, urban development, and snowmelt runoff. The primary objective of the Garfield County Cooperative Mosquito Management Program is to suppress populations of larval mosquitoes in aquatic habitats. Adult mosquito trapping data is used to assess West Nile virus infection rates, as well as the need for adult mosquito control measures.

The Garfield County Cooperative Mosquito Control Program works countywide to provide cost-effective, integrated mosquito management operations. Along with Garfield County, all of the cities and towns in Garfield County participate in the program. Currently, Colorado Mosquito Control, Inc (CMC) acts as the contractor for the program using integrated mosquito management operations that utilize environmentally-sensitive controls and new technologies without negatively impacting the environment.

Periodically, adult mosquito populations become such that CMC must do an Ultra Low Volume (ULV) insecticide spray application in order to reduce adult mosquito populations to tolerable levels and to reduce human exposure to the West Nile virus. Anyone that would like to be notified when these mosquito spraying applications are to take place in their area or to ensure insecticides are not sprayed near their property should contact CMC Operations Manager Steve Sheaffer at (970) 644-1326. For information about the Colorado Pesticide Sensitive Registry follow this link.

The Garfield County Cooperative Mosquito Control Program also recognizes that many people are involved with organic farming and organic home gardening.  CMC has products that are certified for use on or near organic crops by the Organic Materials Review Institute (O.M.R.I.). Technicians are trained to apply these organic products to areas of larval mosquito production around organic operations.  For more information regarding O.M.R.I. certified products CMC has available, call (970) 644-1326 or e-mail to info@comosquitocontrol.com.

Contacts and resources:
For further information, please contact:
Garfield County Mosquito Control Program, Garfield County Vegetation Management - (970) 945-1377 x 4305 

Garfield County West Nile virus prevention, Garfield County Environmental Health - (970) 625-5200 

Colorado Mosquito Control - (970) 644-1326
 

Public health tips

mosquito West Nile virus prevention

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
The best defense against mosquitoes is to prevent their occurrence and keep from being bitten.


Protect yourself
Dusk and dawn: Avoid outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active. 
Dress: If you are outside at dusk or dawn, cover up by wearing long-sleeved shirts, pants, shoes and socks.
Deet: Use mosquito repellents. Products with up to 30 percent DEET are recommended for adults and children over two months of age. 
Drain: Eliminate standing water in tires or other containers as these may serve as mosquito breeding sites.  Change the water in birdbaths and pet dishes frequently. If you have standing water around your home that you cannot drain consider using larvacide in the water.


Selecting an insect repellent
When it comes to discouraging mosquito bites, DEET is the gold standard by which all other repellants are judged. When compared to other active ingredients, DEET-based products provided the most complete protection for the longest amount of time. DEET is safe and effective when used according to label instructions. However, there are a variety of other options to choose from. For people looking for alternative active ingredients, including those derived from plants, there are resources available to help make the appropriate selection. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website "Search for a Repellent that is Right for You" lists EPA registered repellents and the amount of time each is effective.

Shorter protection time does not mean the product is less effective. Key points to remember when selecting an insect repellent include:
  • Insects from which you want protection
  • Length of time you need protection
  • Active ingredient listed on the product label
  • Percentage active ingredient as listed on the product label

Be sure to use a product with a protection time that fits your activity. Keep in mind your results may vary depending on a number of factors:

  • Physical activity/perspiration
  • Water exposure
  • Air temperature
  • How attractive you are to mosquitoes and ticks; every person is different.

It is very important to re-apply repellent according to label instructions.

Fight the Bite Colorado Information about Fight the Bite Colorado, a West Nile virus prevention and education campaign www.fightthebitecolorado.com.

West Nile virus news 2015
July 8, 2015
2015 season wrap-up
The 2015 mosquito season ended with no reported human cases of West Nile Virus reported in Garfield County as of November 5, 2015. The last reported human case in our county was in 2007.

Garfield County encourages its residents and visitors to look through this web page and its links to learn more about mosquitoes and West Nile virus, which can cause serious illness.

The 2015 Annual Report has been prepared by our program contractor, Colorado Mosquito Control, and is available for review on the right hand side.

This page has information on past mosquito populations in Garfield County, prevention tips for the home and garden, repellent choices, and a description on the cooperative program with participation from all of the cities and towns in the county.

Weekly trap data has been posted to the right of this update, as collected by our program contractor, Colorado Mosquito Control. Traps are located at 11 permanent locations throughout the county, and are checked once a week.
July 8, 2015
July 8 - Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Mesa County reports first diagnosed human case of West Nile virus this year


DENVER - An adult male from Mesa County has been diagnosed with West Nile virus. This is Colorado's first human case this year.

Also, mosquitoes collected in Larimer and Denver counties are carrying West Nile virus, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) confirmed. The department expects more counties to find infected mosquitoes as the summer progresses.

Public health officials advise Colorado residents to take precautions against West Nile virus by using mosquito repellent and other methods to avoid mosquito bites. Last year, 118 people in Colorado contracted West Nile virus, and four died.
CDPHE press release-|

2014
August 26, 2014
As of August 27, 2014, the US Geological Survey reported 19 human cases of West Nile Virus in Colorado. On the western slope, there are two reported cases, including one each in Mesa and Montrose counties. There have been no fatalities in the state as of that report.

Attached to the links to the right are the last four weeks of mosquito trap data collected by Colorado Mosquito Control in Garfield County.

Residents are still encouraged to safeguard themselves as much as possible to minimize their exposure to the West Nile Virus. If mosquitoes are present, use a repellent and wear long sleeve shirts and long pants. The species of mosquito that carries West Nile, Culex tarsalis, is particularly active at dawn and dusk.

With all the rainfall we have had in the past week, it is important to check your property for standing water. Mosquitoes lay eggs in still water, which can hatch in seven to 10 days. If standing water is eliminated weekly around a property, mosquitoes will be hampered from breeding.

Here are some things you can do to protect your property:

  • Remove standing water in bird baths, clogged rain gutters, flower pots, plant saucers, puddles, buckets, equipment and cans.
  • Check items that might hold water, including wheelbarrows, pool covers, tarps, plastic garden sheeting, and trash cans.

July 18, 2014
July 18 - During this time of year culex tarsalis mosquitoes (the carrier of West Nile) are more active.

The high count for culex this week in unincorporated Garfield County was in the Willow Creek neighborhood in Battlement Mesa. For the municipalities, the high number was at the Rifle Lyons Rest Area. Both areas were scheduled for fogging this week.

July 15-16 trap data-|

July 16, 2014
July 16, 2014 - Floodwater mosquito counts (the Aedes type, which do not carry West Nile virus) dropped somewhat from last month, while the culex mosquito numbers are increasing in Garfield County. Culex is the carrier of West Nile. The culex numbers increased from a total of 181 in Garfield County for the week of July 1 to 623 for the week of July 8. Colorado Mosquito Control did do some fogging in the areas that had high Culex counts for the week of July 8.

July trap counts:
July 8-9, 2014-|
July 1-2, 2014-|

July 3, 2014 Human cases of West Nile virus identified in Colorado
July 3 - Human cases of West Nile virus identified in Colorado

DENVER - The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment today reported two human cases of West Nile Virus, the first reported cases this season. The two cases are in Saguache and Pueblo counties.

State health officials advised Colorado residents to take precautions against West Nile virus by wearing insect repellent and using other methods to avoid mosquito bites when outdoors this holiday weekend. Last year, Colorado reported 322 cases of West Nile virus disease, including seven deaths.

Jennifer House, state public health veterinarian, explained, "Although we can't predict how much West Nile virus activity will occur this summer, we know that the risk for human disease exists and people should take measures to protect themselves."

To help prevent West Nile virus infection, follow the four D's:
Dusk and dawn: Avoid outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active. 
Dress: If you are outside at dusk or dawn, cover up by wearing long-sleeved shirts, pants, shoes and socks.
Deet: Use mosquito repellents. Products with up to 30 percent DEET are recommended for adults and children over two months of age. 
Drain: Eliminate standing water in tires or other containers as these may serve as mosquito breeding sites.  Change the water in birdbaths and pet dishes frequently. If you have standing water around your home that you cannot drain consider using larvacide in the water.

June 27, 2014 Garfield County finds large numbers of mosquitoes locally

PRESS RELEASE
June 27, 2014


Garfield County finds large numbers of mosquitoes locally
The state reports collection of mosquitoes in Mesa, Delta, and three front range counties carrying West Nile virus


GARFIELD COUNTY, CO - Mosquitoes are appearing in unusually high numbers in Garfield County, and the highest risk for exposure to West Nile virus is typically from late June through early September. Residents are urged to take precautions against West Nile virus. The best defenses for people are to wear insect repellant and cover exposed skin to avoid mosquito bites.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) reported June 18 that mosquitoes collected in Adams, Boulder, Delta, Mesa and Weld counties are carrying West Nile Virus. Last year, Colorado seven people died out of the 322 cases of West Nile virus disease reported to the state.

The virus has not been detected in mosquitoes in Garfield County in 2014. However, the number of Culex mosquitoes, which carry the virus, is projected to increase. "We expect to see higher numbers of mosquitoes that carry the virus as we enter the warmer parts of summer," said Garfield County Vegetation Manager Steve Anthony. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) determined that some of the mosquitoes trapped in three locations in Garfield County in July of 2013 which showed the presence of Culex tested positive as being carriers for West Nile Virus.

The risk of this mosquito-borne disease can affect animal health as well. It is a strain of encephalitis disease, and horses are especially susceptible. Jennifer House, state public health veterinarian, was quoted in the June 19 CDPHE press release as saying: "Although we can't predict how much West Nile virus activity will occur this summer, it is unusual for Colorado to have this many mosquito pools testing positive for the virus this early in the season."

Garfield County contracts with Colorado Mosquito Control (CMC) to monitor and treat mosquitoes. Treatment is focused on the application of an organic larvicide product. Truck-mounted fogging is used on limited basis to target emerged Culex mosquitoes in specific areas. CMC has been monitoring and treating mosquitoes in the county since April, Anthony said.

The traps are checked weekly, and provide information on adult mosquitoes and help direct control efforts. Colorado Mosquito Control submits weekly updates to the county regarding the traps, which are available from the home page of the county website, and full reports are posted online at garfield-county.com/vegetation-management/mosquito-control.aspx.

To help prevent West Nile Virus infection;

 •   DRAIN standing water around your house weekly. Don't forget to drain water from tires, cans, flowerpots, clogged rain gutters, rain barrels, toys and puddles.
 •   DUSK and DAWN are when mosquitoes that carry the virus are most active. Limit outdoor activities or take precautions to prevent mosquito bites during these times.
 •   DEET is an effective ingredient to look for in insect repellents. Always follow label instructions carefully.
.  •  DRESS in long sleeves and pants in areas where mosquitoes are active.

For more information about West Nile virus, visit www.FightTheBiteColorado.com.

2013
2013 death from West Nile virus in Colorado
2013 death from West Nile virus in Colorado
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment West Nile virus surveillance update

Weld County has reported the first death from West Nile virus (WNV) in Colorado in 2013. As of August 26, 2013, 72 cases of WNV infections have been reported in Colorado. Though less than one percent of people infected with WNV develop neuroinvasive disease (encephalitis, meningitis, and/or acute flaccid paralysis), they are more often recognized and diagnosed due to the severity of their disease. The fatality rate for these patients is less than 10%. Those older than 65 years of age are at increased risk of developing neuroinvasive WNV disease.

Since surveillance for West Nile virus (WNV) began in early June, 2114 pools of culex species mosquitoes have been submitted from Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Delta, Garfield, Jefferson, Larimer, Mesa, Morgan, Prowers, Pueblo, and Weld counties. As of August 26th, 372 (17.6%) pools have tested positive for WNV from Adams (12), Arapahoe (2), Boulder (60), Delta (5), Garfield (4), Jefferson (4), Larimer (177), Mesa (32), Morgan (7), Prowers (3), Pueblo (2), and Weld (64) counties. In 2012 during this same period, 163 (10.7%) mosquito pools were positive out of 1519 tested.

Environmental conditions in Colorado continue to favor West Nile virus activity, though mosquito populations will naturally decrease into the autumn. Continued rain along the Front Range maintains high water levels in larval mosquito habitats. In addition, higher than normal humidity favors mosquito survival. There is still risk to humans from the bites of WNV infected mosquitoes, and local health departments should continue advocating people protect themselves from WNV disease by implementing personal protective measures such as the 4 D's (DEET, drain, dusk & dawn, and dress).

The data from late August will be the final set of data for the year, however Colorado Mosquito Control will continue working through most of September. Cooler evening temps have caused a big drop off in culex numbers.

For more information on West Nile virus prevention, contact the Garfield County Health Department at 970-625-5200, http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/ or www.fightthebitecolorado.com/.

For information regarding the county's mosquito control program, please contact Steve Anthony, Garfield County vegetation manager, at 970-945-1377, ext. 4305.


July 17, 2013 Mosquitoes trapped in Garfield County show West Nile presence
PRESS RELEASE
July 17, 2013

Mosquitoes trapped in Garfield County show West Nile presence

Mosquitoes trapped in Garfield County show West Nile presence Vegetation Management Division addresses mosquito populations with treatment applications GARFIELD COUNTY, CO - The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has determined that some of the mosquitoes trapped in three locations in Garfield County showing the presence of culex have tested positive as being carriers for West Nile virus. Colorado Mosquito Control sent five mosquito pool samples to CDPHE to analyze the collected samples for West Nile virus. Three of the five July 9-10, 2013 pool submittals tested positive, stemming from mosquitoes collected in Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa, Parachute Cottonwood Park and Mile Pond Road, just southeast of Rifle.

Traps are located at 11 locations throughout the county. Garfield County Vegetation Management contracts Colorado Mosquito Control, Inc to check the traps once a week. The traps provide information on adult mosquitoes and help guide control efforts. Colorado Mosquito Control submits weekly updates to the county regarding the traps, which are available from the home page of the county website, and are posted online at garfield-county.com/vegetation-management/mosquito-control.aspx. The charts in the update reflect the quantity of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location, and also break down the trap count by individual species.

The species of mosquito of concern is culex tarsalis. culex is indicated in red in the update's pie charts. culex numbers that approach 50 or greater in a trap, in a single night are a concern. This usually leads to a limited, truck-mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes by Colorado Mosquito Control. When culex counts are in that range, residents should safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes. culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

Culex (the carrier of West Nile), was high last week in the following spots in Garfield County:

Location                                                 culex
•    Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa        112
•    Parachute Cottonwood Park               107
•    Rifle Rest Area                                    95
•    Mile Pond Rd                                       66
•    Silt Roundabout area                          48
•    Coal Ridge High School                      55

The season's first human case of West Nile virus was reported on July 3, 2013 in Delta County, prompting Garfield County Public Health Department staff to increase awareness and prevention efforts. The department is encouraging residents to drain standing water, dress in long sleeves and pants at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, and use an effective insect repellent.

"We live in an area where culex mosquitoes - the ones that carry the West Nile virus, are present. But that doesn't mean we need to refrain from doing the outdoor activities we enjoy; it just means we need to take a few simple precautions," said Yvonne Long, director of Garfield County Public Health. "When it comes to discouraging mosquito bites, DEET is the gold standard by which all other repellants are judged." When compared to other active ingredients, DEET-based products provided the most complete protection for the longest amount of time. However, there are a variety of other options to choose from.

"We know that DEET is effective and safe when used properly," said Long. "However, we also know that people are interested in alternatives, and may not know which of these are effective against bites."

For people looking for alternative active ingredients, including those derived from plants, there are resources available to help make the appropriate selection. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website "Search for a Repellent that is Right for You," http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/insect/#searchform, lists EPA registered repellents and the amount of time each is effective.

"Be sure to choose a repellent with a protection time that fits your activity, perspiration level, your environment, and how attractive you are to insects. It is also very important to re-apply repellent according to label instructions," says Long.

For more information on West Nile virus prevention, contact the Garfield County Health Department at 970-625-5200, http://www.cdc.gov/westnile/ or www.fightthebitecolorado.com/. For information regarding the county's mosquito control program, please contact Steve Anthony, Garfield County vegetation manager, at 970-945-1377, ext. 4305.


July 3, 2013 - CDPHE - Season's first human case of West Nile virus reported
DENVER - The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment today reported the state's first human case of West Nile virus. Surveillance shows the West Nile virus is circulating in mosquitoes around the state.

With the long holiday weekend approaching, the department is reminding people to take precautions to avoid mosquito bites between dusk and dawn when infected mosquitoes typically feed.

"It's time to pack the mosquito repellent when heading out for fireworks, camping or any outdoor activities during evening hours," recommended John Pape, state epidemiologist in charge of West Nile virus surveillance. "The threat of West Nile virus doesn't mean you have to avoid activities you enjoy, but it is important to take a few simple steps to avoid mosquito bites".

The human case occurred in a Delta County resident who became ill 11 days after reporting numerous mosquito bites while attending an outdoor, early evening event. The patient, who developed West Nile virus fever, a less severe form of the disease, recovered following a brief hospitalization. A West Nile virus-related death also occurred recently from a 2012 case. Investigation revealed the patient had been infected in August 2012 and developed a severe complication of the disease known as acute flaccid paralysis. He never recovered this illness, which eventually contributed to his death this June.

"We know that, for most people, infection with West Nile virus usually results in a mild illness from which patients recover," said Pape, "But for some people, it is a life-altering or life-threatening illness. Since there is no way to predict how sick any one person will become if infected, the best medicine is to prevent illness by avoiding mosquito bites."

In addition to the human case, 21 mosquito pools (groups of mosquitoes batched together for testing) have tested positive from Adams (1), Boulder (2), Larimer (6), Mesa (8), Pueblo (2) and Weld (2) counties. A sick llama was confirmed with West Nile virus infection from Mesa county.

The state health department, local health departments and mosquito control companies have conducted surveillance for West Nile virus since 2001. The virus was first detected in Colorado in 2002. West Nile virus is carried by certain birds and transmitted to people by bites from mosquitoes that have fed on infected birds. Female culex mosquitoes, the species that transmits the virus, usually start emerging in late April or early May and continue transmitting the virus until the first frost, which usually is in late September along the Front Range. The highest risk period for human exposure is generally from late June through early September, when mosquito populations and infection rates peak.

In 2012, Colorado had an active West Nile virus year with 131 reported cases and five deaths. Forty-six percent of these patients developed more severe, neuroinvasive forms of the disease in which the virus invades the spinal cord or brain. In contrast, 2011 was a very quiet year with just seven cases reported. Colorado's peak year occurred in 2003 when 2,847 cases and 63 deaths were reported. Although the severity of any given year cannot be accurately predicted, surveillance and weather patterns thus far suggest the possibility of another active transmission season in 2013.

Pape reminds people of the "Four D" precautions to take against West Nile virus:

•   Drain standing water around the house weekly since that's where mosquitoes lay eggs. Be sure to empty old tires, cans, flowerpots, clogged rain gutters, rain barrels and toys where puddles can occur.

•   Dusk and dawn are when mosquitoes that carry the virus are most active, so limit outdoor activities or take precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

•   DEET is an effective ingredient to look for in insect repellents. Always follow label instructions carefully.

•   Dress in light-weight long sleeves and pants during dawn and dusk or in areas where mosquitoes are active.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and local public health agencies maintain a website with additional information about West Nile virus at www.FightTheBiteColorado.com.

Sept 7, 2012 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment advisory
West Nile virus: take precautions
DENVER - As of Sept. 7, 2012, 51 human cases of West Nile virus have been reported to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. This is a sharp increase over 2011, when there were just seven cases, but significantly below the 578 cases in 2007 and the 2,847 cases in the peak year of 2003. The 51 cases this year includes two deaths in Montrose County. Elisabeth Lawaczeck, state public health veterinarian, advises people to continue to take precautions against West Nile virus by wearing insect repellent, draining standing water and using other methods to avoid mosquito bites when outdoors. Typically, West Nile virus season should be winding down now, but mosquitoes that carry the disease still are circulating.

West Nile virus is carried by certain birds and transmitted to people by bites from mosquitoes that have fed on infected birds. Female culex mosquitoes, the species that transmits the virus, usually start emerging in late April or early May and continue transmitting the virus until the first frost, which usually is in September along the Front Range.

Precautions to take against West Nile virus include the "Four Ds":

- Drain standing water around the house weekly since that's where mosquitoes lay eggs. Be sure to empty old tires, cans, flowerpots, clogged rain gutters, rain barrels and toys where puddles can occur.

- Dusk and dawn are when mosquitoes that carry the virus are most active, so limit outdoor activities or take precautions to prevent mosquito bites.

- DEET is an effective ingredient to look for in insect repellents. Always follow label instructions carefully.

- Dress in long sleeves and pants during dawn and dusk or in areas where mosquitoes are active.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and local public health agencies maintain a website with additional information about West Nile virus at www.FightTheBiteColorado.com.

Aug 3, 2012 Garfield County recommends precautions during West Nile season
Press release from Garfield County
Take precautions during West Nile season
Centers for Disease Control reports West Nile virus cases are up this year

Garfield County, CO – Late summer presents an increased incidence of mosquitoes in Garfield County, creating an increased risk of West Nile virus. The strongest concentrations of the type of mosquitoes that may carry the virus have been found in the Grand Valley area of Garfield County in recent weeks. This is because that region is warmer and at a lower altitude than the rest of the county, and Mesa and Delta counties have experienced an increase in West Nile occurrences in mosquitoes.

West Nile virus is carried by certain infected birds and transmitted to people by bites from mosquitoes that have fed on these birds.

Garfield County press release


Aug 1, 2012 CDC reports West Nile virus disease cases up in 2012
Press release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
West Nile virus disease cases up this year

Take steps to protect yourself and your family

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging people to take steps to prevent West Nile virus infections. Outbreaks of West Nile virus disease occur each summer in the United States. This year, some areas of the country are experiencing earlier and greater activity.

Thus far in 2012, 42 states have reported West Nile virus infections in people, birds, or mosquitoes. A total of 241 cases of West Nile virus disease, including four deaths, have been reported to CDC. This is the highest number of cases reported through the end of July since 2004. Almost 80 percent of the cases have been reported from three states, Texas, Mississippi, and Oklahoma.

Press release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Mosquito trap summaries
2013
August 13-14, 2013 culex tarsalis concern
This is a summary of the mosquito trap data collected by Colorado Mosquito Control for Garfield County on August 13th and 14th.

Traps are located at 11 permanent locations throughout the county. They are checked once a week. The traps provide information on adult mosquitoes and help guide control efforts.

Culex tarsalis is the species of concern in relation to West Nile. culex is indicated in red in the pie charts.

The charts in the update reflect the quantity of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location and also break down the trap count by individual species.

Culex numbers that approach 50 or greater in a trap, in a single night are a concern. This usually leads to a limited; truck-mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes. When culex counts are in that range, residents should safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes. culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

Summary of trap counts:

A comparison of culex counts from last week and two weeks ago in County hot spots:

Location  culex Aug 13-14 culex Aug 6-7
• Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa 21 356
• Parachute Cottonwood Park 3 56
• Rifle Rest Area   27 26
• Mile Pond Rd 18 47
• Coal Ridge High School 22 97

Trends

The good news is that culex counts continue to drop as nighttime temperatures decrease.

Again all county residents are urged to safeguard themselves against mosquito bites, particularly when culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

As of August 19th, 2013, there are 36 confirmed human cases of West Nile virus infections in Colorado, with six of those cases coming from the Western Slope (Delta County-5, Mesa County-1).

For further information, please contact:
Garfield County Vegetation Management - (970) 945-1377 x 4305
Garfield County Environmental Health - (970) 665-6383
Colorado Mosquito Control - (970) 644-1326
August 7-8, 2013 culex tarsalis concern
This is a summary of the mosquito trap data collected by Colorado Mosquito Control for Garfield County on August 7th and 8th.

Traps are located at 11 permanent locations throughout the County. They are checked once a week. The traps provide information on adult mosquitoes and help guide control efforts.

The species of mosquito that we are concerned with is culex tarsalis. culex is indicated in red in the pie charts.

The charts in the update reflect the quantity of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location and it also breaks down the trap count by individual species.

Culex numbers that approach 50 or greater in a trap, in a single night are a concern. This usually leads to a limited; truck mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes. When culex counts are in that range, residents should safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes. culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

Summary of trap counts:

A comparison of culex counts from last week and two weeks ago in County hot spots:

Location  culex Aug 6-7 culex July 27-31
• Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa 356 431
• Parachute Cottonwood Park 56 412
• Rifle Rest Area   26 110
• Mile Pond Rd 47 99
• Coal Ridge High School 97 95


Trends

The good news is that culex counts overall are dropping as nighttime temperatures decrease, the exception being the counts from Coal Ridge High School.

Again all county residents are urged to safeguard themselves against mosquito bites, particularly when culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

For further information, please contact:
Garfield County Vegetation Management - (970) 945-1377 x 4305
Garfield County Environmental Health - (970) 665-6383
Colorado Mosquito Control - (970) 644-1326
July 27-31, 2013 culex tarsalis concern
This is a summary of the mosquito trap data collected by Colorado Mosquito Control for Garfield County from July 27 through July 31, 2013, and an update on new developments regarding mosquitoes in our community.

Traps are located at 11 permanent locations throughout the county.  They are checked once a week.  The traps provide information on adult mosquitoes and help guide control efforts.

The species of mosquito that we are concerned with is culex tarsalis.  culex is indicated in red in the pie charts shown below.

Last week two new temporary traps were set up; one in Carbondale at the Hendricks Ranch area, and the other one at the Rifle Creek Golf Course.  The good news is both sites showed low amounts of culex tarsalis, with 4 mosquitoes trapped at the Hendricks Ranch and 2 at the Rifle Golf Course.

The charts in the update reflect the quantity of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location and also breaks down the trap count by individual species.

Culex numbers that approach 50 or greater in a trap, in a single night are a concern.   This usually leads to a limited; truck mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes.   When culex counts are in that range, residents should safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes.  culex is most active at dawn and dusk. 

Summary:
Culex (the carrier of West Nile), was high last week in the following spots:

Location                                                 culex
•    Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa        432
•    Parachute Cottonwood Park               412
•    Rifle Rest Area                                    110
•    Mile Pond Rd                                       91
•    Coal Ridge High School                      95

Update on testing:
Our program coordinator, Colorado Mosquito Control, submitted 19 pools of mosquito samples to the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE)  on August 2, 2013 to test the samples for the presence of the West Nile Virus.   Each pool consists of approximately 65 mosquitoes.  

CDPHE notified Garfield County of the results on Tuesday, August 6.  Of the 19 submitted pools, only one pool came back with a positive result for West Nile.  This was a pool that had samples from Rifle Middle School and the Mile Pond area so we cannot definitively pinpoint the exact location of the positive result; again all county residents are urged to safeguard themselves against mosquito bites, particularly when culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

For further information, please contact:
Garfield County Vegetation Management - (970) 945-1377 x 4305
Garfield County Environmental Health - (970) 665-6383
Colorado Mosquito Control - (970) 644-1326
July 9-10, 2013 culex tarsalis concern
This is a summary of the mosquito trap data collected by Colorado Mosquito Control for Garfield County on July 9-10, 2013.

Traps are located at 11 locations throughout the county. They are checked once a week. The traps provide information on adult mosquitoes and help guide control efforts.

The charts in the update reflect the quantity of mosquitoes trapped in a single night in a specific location and it also breaks down the trap count by individual species.

The species of mosquito that we are concerned with is culex tarsalis. culex is indicated in red in the pie charts.

Culex numbers that approach 50 or greater in a trap, in a single night are a concern. This usually leads to a limited; truck mounted fogging of the affected area for adult mosquitoes. When culex counts are in that range, residents should safeguard themselves to minimize their exposure to mosquitoes. culex is most active at dawn and dusk.

Summary:

culex (the carrier of West Nile), was high last week in the following spots: :

Location                                                 culex
•    Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa        112
•    Parachute Cottonwood Park               107
•    Rifle Rest Area                                    95
•    Mile Pond Rd                                       66
•    Silt Roundabout area                          48
•    Coal Ridge High School                      55

Testing of Mosquitoes: Colorado Mosquito Control sent 5 mosquito pool samples to the Colorado Department of Public, Health and the Environment to analyze the collected samples for West Nile virus. Three of the 5 pools submittals tested positive. The positive locations are:
Willow Creek in Battlement Mesa
Parachute Cottonwood Park
Mile Pond Road just southeast of Rifle
For further information, please contact:
Garfield County Vegetation Management - (970) 945-1377 x 4305
Garfield County Environmental Health - (970) 665-6383
Colorado Mosquito Control - (970) 644-1326

Mosquito trap data 2013-2016
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Vegetation Management
195 West 14th Street, Building D, Suite 310
Rifle, CO 81650
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